Music charity organizations

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Like everyone in the music biz, mixers and producers have a reverence for the giants whose shoulders they stand on. We love to learn from the greats and, in this book, journalist and engineer Howard Massey sits down with 37 of them to record their hard-won insights. From Sir George Martin to Phil Ramone to Alan Parsons, we’re treated to intimate insights into how these producers makes great records and what makes each of them tick. Many of the common lessons here we knew already — such as the importance of getting the best performance over fixing things during the mixing process — but there’s real value in the way that these sentiments and lessons are articulated differently by each interviewee.

You have an idea, and it needs to be discussed publicly. What do you do? Start a podcast, obviously! I’m not here to tell you what to talk about but I will say this: It needs to be engaging and produced in a way that makes sense. Good content is always engaging, no matter how badly recorded it is. That being said, good production can make content even more engaging.

Labeling tracks and keeping a detailed record of what’s happening during a recording session is crucial for saving time. Don’t do this during the initial recording process, which should flow without periodic interruptions, but rather when you’re mixing the material later on. Take a small amount of time to label each track or input before and after you record each piece. And keep handwritten notes in a notebook (or at least on a separate screen other than the one used to record).

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It’s important to keep in mind that a lack of lyrics doesn’t mean that a piece is formless. Things are still frequently organized into typical sections of four, eight, 16, or 32 bars.

Jeremy is a Montreal-based musician, sound artist and improviser who loves giving advice to emerging artists on how to make their tours more effective. He writes, records and performs electroacoustic “concrète” music for tape, oscillators and amplified objects and surfaces, as well as solo guitar. He has performed and released material throughout Europe and the UK, Asia, the US and Canada, mostly with his trio Sontag Shogun.

Anytime you want to use intervals based on perfect fifths, you’re multiplying and dividing by 3, but anytime you want to use intervals based on major thirds, you’re multiplying and dividing by 5. Starting from C, it’s possible to produce any note on the piano if you multiply or divide your frequencies by 3 enough times, but those notes won’t be in tune with the notes you’d get multiplying or dividing your frequencies by 5, because 3 and 5 don’t mutually divide evenly. This is not just an abstract mathematical issue. It’s the reason that it’s impossible to have a guitar be in tune with itself.

When I was first asked to analyze a pop tune, I felt it was my Canadian duty to avoid Justin Bieber’s tune “Sorry” (which a real Canadian would have pronounced “SORE-ee” rather than “SAW-ree”). However, I live with a semi-secret Belieber, so the song was hard to avoid, and it turns out there’s actually something pretty harmonically hip going on under Justin’s dulcet tones.

Terrestrial radio can be a powerful medium for promoting your new release. Here are four steps to using your efforts wisely and achieving great air time!

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Explore our wide array of free online courses to expand your musical skills and gain a competitive edge on your lunch break! With free online courses such as Alternate Tunings for the Creative Guitarist, Touring on a Shoestring, How to Get All the Royalties You Never Knew Existed, and Digital Pedalboards with Kaki King, here’s what you can expect to see on Soundfly. 

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

We look at Ligeti’s famous composition in order to decide how much, or how little, the use of music’s foundational parameters really matter in composing.

This gripping narrative follows a suicidal lady who is saved by a stranger, but quickly becomes obsessive and forces the man to abandon her in her confused and unsafe mental state. Frustrated and full of anguish, the lady runs back to the very same building to fulfill her earlier wish, before we see her intentionally drop her shoe in front of another man, revealing to the viewer her malicious deception to find herself a partner.

We’ll keep it in the family again with the second release in Ashikawa’s “Wave Notation” series, his own album, Still Way. This record actually features Midori Takada on harp and vibraphone. Ashikawa only released three records in this series before he died; the third was a full LP of pensive Erik Satie pieces played on solo piano by Satsuki Shibano.